Planet Exotis Pets Farms

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CANE CORSO

$1,500.00 $1,300.00

The Cane Corso is an Italian breed of mastiff. It is used for personal protection, tracking, law enforcement, as a guard dog, and as a companion dog.

  • Life expectancy: 10 – 12 years
  • Origin: Italy
  • Temperament: Reserved, Stable, Quiet, Even Tempered, Trainable, Calm
  • Weight: Female: 40–45 kg, Male: 45–50 kg
  • Height: Female: 58–66 cm, Male: 62–70 cm
  • Colors: Black, Chestnut Brindle, Fawn, Grey, Black Brindle, Red
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The Cane Corso is a working dog who absolutely loves having a job to do. This old Italian dog breed was developed to guard property and hunt big game such as wild boar.

Although these are purebred dogs, you may find them in the care of rescue groups or shelters. Remember to adopt! Don’t shop if you want to bring one of these dogs home.

Cane Corsos are powerful and athletic, best suited to experienced pet parents who have large, securely fenced yards. They’ll definitely need their humans to give them a task; otherwise, they may find their own ways to reduce boredom — probably with destructive behavior. If you can give your dog plenty of space, exercise, and training, then this may be the breed for you!

See below for all dog breed traits and facts about Cane Corsos!

HISTORY

The Corso is one of many Mastiff-type dogs. This one was developed in Italy and is said to descend from Roman war dogs. He is more lightly built than his cousin, the Neapolitan Mastiff, and was bred to hunt game, guard property, and be an all-around farm hand. Their work included rounding up pigs or cattle and helping to drive them to market.

The word “cane,” of course, is Latin for dog and derives from the word “canis.” The word “corso” may come from “cohors,” meaning bodyguard, or from “corsus,” an old Italian word meaning sturdy or robust.

The breed declined as farming became more mechanized and came near to extinction, but starting in the 1970s dog fanciers worked to rebuild the Corso. The Society Amatori Cane Corso was formed in 1983, and the Federation Cynologique Internationale recognized the breed in 1996.

A man named Michael Sottile imported the first litter of Corsos to the United States in 1988, followed by a second litter in 1989. The International Cane Corso Association was formed in 1993. Eventually, the breed club sought recognition from the American Kennel Club, which was granted in 2010. The breed is now governed by the Cane Corso Association of America.

Size
The Corso is a large, muscular dog. Males stand 25 to 27.5 inches at the withers; females 23.5 to 26 inches. Weight is proportionate to height and typically ranges from 90 to 120 pounds.
Children And Other Pets
When he is properly raised, trained, and socialized, the Corso can be loving toward and protective of children. It’s important, however, that puppies and adult dogs not be given any opportunity to chase children and that kids avoid making high-pitched sounds in his presence. Running and squealing may cause the Corso to associate children with prey. Keep him confined when kids are running around outdoors and making lots of noise, especially if your children have friends over. The Corso may think it necessary to step in and protect “his” kids, and that is unlikely to end well. Games of fetch or — for young children — helping to hold the leash are good ways for children to interact with a Cane Corso puppy or adult.

As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he’s eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog’s food away. No dog, no matter how loving, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.

The Corso may get along with other dogs or cats if he is raised with them, but he will likely view strange animals as prey and do his best to kill them. It’s essential to be able to protect neighbors’ pets from him. This is another instance in which socialization is a must. Your Cane Corso should learn from an early age to remain calm in the presence of other dogs. If you do get a second dog, either another Cane Corso or a different breed, it is best to choose one of the opposite sex.

Gender

Male, Female, Both

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